Dog Food and Feeding Your Dog

Dog Food and Feeding Your Dog

There is no better or more suitable food for the house-dog than table scraps, the meat being cut fine enough to prevent its being specially picked out and the rest left. Mix this with bread and mashed vegetables, moistened with gravy or soup. Dogs are much better out of the dining-room, except in the case of a thoroughly trained one that will not beg for food. Puppies should always be excluded and food taken to them preferably out of doors, or to some certain place always used for this purpose, so that the dog will learn that this and this only is its feeding-place. Have a dish of clean water there also, and if you wish to oblige your many advisers, you can put a piece of sulphur in the dish, or if you have not that handy, a stone will do as well, for neither is soluble in water. Sulphur is good for the dog, but it needs to be administered in another way. Take equal parts of sulphur and mag- nesia, mix thoroughly and put in the evening meal for a week as much as will cover a dime, and then discontinue. This will cool your dog off in the summer time. For anything smaller than a fox-terrier reduce the quantity one-half. Sulphur is also good for outward application for cuts, wounds or sores; our almost universal remedy for these being crude petroleum and sulphur mixed to the consistency of thick cream. Stick-sulphur, however,, is of no more use than a stone.

How Often to Feed Your Dog

How often to feed a dog depends upon age and weather. As we feed children oftener than we do ourselves, and we eat more in winter than in summer, so, too, in the case of a puppy of two months old, feed it at least five times a day the last meal late in the evening, and the first as early as possible in the morning. In another month or so drop off the late meal, extending the time between the day meals. At the age of five months three meals a day should suffice, and in another month or so, if it is warm weather, a morning and night meal will be ample. Here again we must be governed by considerations of the breed and the individual. Some breeds you want as large as possible, while others should be of moderate size, and still others are better when as small as possible. To make a big man, it is of no use to stint the boy until he is eighteen years of age and then stuff him. His best growing age is past then, and so it is with a St. Bernard or any dog whose growth we wish to be as large as possible collie, setter, great Dane, and others in the same category. Keep a dog of this kind grow- ing continuously from the time he leaves his dam till he is a year old, espe- cially so in the case of the larger breeds, as they are slow to attain full height^ whereas collies, setters, and the like have pretty well reached their growth at ten months, after which they mature. Terriers and such as can be made too large by over-feeding should be brought to three or two meals a day sooner than large dogs. Toys it is better to feed with non-stimulating food than to limit the meals too much. Use cereals with a smaller quantity of meat, or rice and fish, the idea being not to grow a dog devoid of shape, as will be the case if it never has a full meal. For these small breeds the toy-dog biscuits are very useful when fed plain or with a little soup or gravy, there being meat enough in them for ordinary use.

The exercise of a little judgment in this regard is the best advice that can be given. One should always remember that he is injuring his dog more by getting him fat than by cutting out the meat in his dish, and having him smell and leave his food. He will eat when he is hungry. Some will get along on almost nothing. We once had an Irish terrier that we took to Southport show, in England, where she was given equal first in the variety class, the judges being two well-known gentlemen. One of them, either the late Mr. Lort or the late John Douglas, said: “You would have won sir, if your terrier had not been so fat.” We said that it was impossible to keep her down and that she had but one biscuit a day. “Show it to her, show it don’t let her eat it!” On the other hand, with some dogs one might almost shovel the food into them and then they would never be more than passably fat, for, like ourselves, it is not the heaviest eater that is the stoutest person at the table.